BLOG #documentary


A one-stop place for things related to life, art, street and documentary photography and tips and ideas for personal photography.

Although I myself am fairly new to the area, I have indeed already grown accustomed to the impressive and slightly daunting cooling towers located nearby. I can fully understand the sentiment of locals watching a large part of their everyday vista suddenly disappear into the dust clouds, it's not exactly the same as slightly altering the local landscape by chopping down a few trees or adding some.

If you're from the West and elsewhere and not as familiar with the history of everything that went down east of the Berlin Wall, you might, however, have come across the new historical HBO TV mini series "Chernobyl" (2019). If you haven't yet, I highly recommend it! Wait, what does this have to do with photography?

I wouldn't go as far as ever calling myself an architecture photographer (I'm just a..photographer, I suppose), but I do enjoy the pleasing feeling of connecting lines, of watching the simplicity take over a busy scene that might be right in front of me, yet looking up I see "less is more"-kinda scene, and it simply pleases me for that moment.

Don't lie, most of us are guilty of not bothering to pick up our camera and photograph what's close to our hearts and homes. But why should we push ourselves to do it more, even if there's no immediate reward (or is there?)?

Even though postpartum bodies aren't something that our society likes to talk about or showcase for public display, we've all come from the same place so it's about time we started celebrating the processes women's bodies go through to bring a new life into this world. Which is why photographer Grace Elizabeth has created a "Gold Dust" project to look into postpartum motherhood.

For some of us becoming old may be a thing of a distant future, for others it may be a day-to-day experience. However, for many of us "empathy for our older population is lacking, and audiences need reminding that we are all aging and old people need to feel the joy of human interaction too".