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A one-stop place for things related to life, art, street and documentary photography and tips and ideas for personal photography.

You may know how to photograph your subject in a certain light situation, you may know how to compose your photograph to create additional drama, but do you allow your true emotions and feelings shine in your work?

Don't lie, most of us are guilty of not bothering to pick up our camera and photograph what's close to our hearts and homes. But why should we push ourselves to do it more, even if there's no immediate reward (or is there?)?

As a wedding photographer, it's not always easy to find balance between the style of work you're genuinely passionate about and the type of work that pays the bills. So, how can you shoot personal projects to improve your professional photography work?

As someone who shoots boudoir alongside the weddings, I always knew that this type of intimate photography could and should become a life-long reminder to clients that their life, bodies, and minds should be admired, and as such documented. It could be a way of celebrating a weight loss journey, or perhaps getting through a draining relationship to regain power and energy, or maybe to remind yourself that you as you are today is something worth celebrating in its own right.

Even though postpartum bodies aren't something that our society likes to talk about or showcase for public display, we've all come from the same place so it's about time we started celebrating the processes women's bodies go through to bring a new life into this world. Which is why photographer Grace Elizabeth has created a "Gold Dust" project to look into postpartum motherhood.

There's much to be said about enriching the photography industry through positive and honest collaborations between professionals, but one thing I think we don't talk about enough is the benefits of shooting weddings with a trusted second shooter and how it can benefit your business and even your wellbeing.

Turns out you don't always need to be an amazing photographer to create photographic art. I came across graphic designer Bashar Hjooj's work on Instagram, where he combines two to three photographs shot by complete strangers to create art full of imagination with his own take.

Why do we keep creating? Why do we feel the need to keep creating something that nowadays merely feeds to the largely insatiable society that craves new content, new trends, new visuals? Jakob Owens created a brief but thought-evoking video which gives an insight in how today's creative mind works.

For some of us becoming old may be a thing of a distant future, for others it may be a day-to-day experience. However, for many of us "empathy for our older population is lacking, and audiences need reminding that we are all aging and old people need to feel the joy of human interaction too".

If you're like me, you will find that before shooting your clients you will feel as nervous as they are, or even more! I have found that there are certain things I can do to relax myself and my clients before, during and after our session, which also helps to create a long lasting relationship and hopefully creates a repeat booking. So, what can you do to make the photographic experience as painless as possible and create a rewarding relationship with your client?

I've noticed a trend in people photography, namely, many of us tend to move from one model to the next one far too quickly, and far too often. At times, it appears that it doesn't really matter who the next subject is or what their personality is like, as long as there is a model shoot booked in. While for some it may provide a reason to boast about their newest portfolio addition, to others it's simply a routine that can be difficult to break out of. So, why should we focus on shooting the same person more than once?

What happens when a visual artist overhears his uncles discussing how women "are better off cooking, taking care of the kitchen, and fulfilling their 'womanly duties?'" Eli Rezkallah, who's a photographer and a visual artist currently residing in Beirut, came up with the idea of creating a controversial set of photographs that reverse the traditional gender roles, that had been so strongly embedded within our society through advertisement during the twentieth century.